Education

2020-2021 Planning Guide for Schools – Minnesota Dept. of Health

Reopening of school is critical during the COVID-19 pandemic, when many children and families are experiencing additional economic hardships, social isolation, and other stressors. Schools are a critical component of communities and have tremendous impact on the health, well-being, growth, and development of students and families. Education is a fundamental determinant of health because it cultivates life skills, knowledge and reasoning, social-emotional awareness and control, and community engagement, which serve people over the course of a lifetime. Schools themselves also function as tools and resources for public health intervention by addressing core needs such as nutrition, access to health and social support services, and engagement and support of families and the community as a whole.
The spring of 2020 brought about unprecedented changes to our society and our education system. As we look forward to the 2020-21 school year in our pre-kindergarten (pre-K) through grade 12 schools, we anticipate that SARS-CoV-2 – the virus that causes COVID-19 – will continue to circulate. Students, teachers, and other school staff will be at risk for transmitting and acquiring infection. It is important that everyone in the school community take steps to reduce transmission, particularly to those at high risk, while balancing the need to maintain a strong education system that effectively supports staff, students, and communities.
We developed this document to provide pre-K through grade 12 (K-12) school leaders guidance around policies, practices, and strategies that districts and schools must implement and recommendations they should consider to optimize education and promote health and safety, while mitigating risk throughout the school year. Use this guidance document in combination with the additional guidance provided by the Minnesota Department of Education, which includes both strategies for implementation of health guidance in schools, as well as other non-health related considerations for the 2020-21 school year.
Additional guidance will be published as the COVID-19 response evolves throughout the summer and into the fall.

Education

RECOVERING, REBUILDING, AND RENEWING: THE SPIRIT OF NEW YORK’S SCHOOLS REOPENING GUIDANCE

The closing of schools in March 2020 has profoundly affected the lives of New Yorkers. This impact will continue through the 2020-21 school year and beyond. While no one can predict all the challenges that may arise over the coming weeks and months, it is imperative that we plan for a safe and orderly return to school.
Without question, our paramount concern is to ensure the health and safety of everyone in our schools, children and adults alike. At the same time, we must also contend with a myriad of complex challenges – catching up on months of lost in-person instruction; addressing students’ social and emotional needs in the wake of this catastrophe; ensuring all students have the ability to participate equitably in remote learning; planning for the possibility of deep budget cuts; and so many others.
The Board of Regents and Department’s task was to create a framework to help guide schools and school districts as they continue to plan for school to return in the fall, whether instruction takes place in person, remotely, or through some combination of the two. That framework is presented here, in this guidance document.
The guidance provides schools and districts with the flexibility they will need to develop and implement creative solutions to their unique, local circumstances. It describes the reopening actions that schools must take and those that are recommended best practices to be considered.

Education

LOUISIANA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH REOPENING GUIDELINES FOR LOUISIANA PUBLIC AND NONPUBLIC SCHOOLS

In light of the Governor’s Roadmap to Restarting Louisiana, the Department is issuing guidance pertaining to opening public and nonpublic school facilities to serve students in the 2020-2021 school year. This guidance is relative to operating schools in Phases 1, 2, and Phase 3 of reopening.
This guidance is based on current medical knowledge of how COVID-19 is transmitted, primarily through close physical contact, vocal and musical activities during which aerosol particles might be emitted, and touching shared surfaces or objects.
Protective measures in school settings include:
• Social distancing, achieved by establishing and, for the maximum number of days possible, maintaining small groups of individuals that minimally interact with other groups or individuals, including in shared indoor spaces;
• Monitoring students and staff for symptoms of fever, cough, shortness of breath or sore throat; and
• Practicing frequent environmental cleaning and handwashing.

Education

INTERIM GUIDANCE FOR IN-PERSON INSTRUCTION AT PRE-K TO GRADE 12 SCHOOLS DURING THE COVID-19 PUBLIC HEALTH EMERGENCY – NY State Dept. of Health

This Interim Guidance for In-Person Instruction at Pre-K to Grade 12 Schools during the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency (“Interim COVID-19 Guidance for Schools”) was created to provide all elementary (including pre-kindergarten), middle, and high schools, as well as their employees, contractors, students, and parents/legal guardians of students with precautions to help protect against the spread of COVID-19 for schools that are authorized to provide in-person instruction in the 2020-2021 school year.
This guidance is intended to address all types of public and private (both secular and non-secular) elementary (including pre-kindergarten), middle, and high schools. In addition to affirming to understand and meet the requirements described herein, school districts, boards of cooperative educational services (BOCES), charter schools, and private schools must develop individual plans for reopening and operating during the COVID-19 public health emergency. Each plan must meet the minimum standards set forth in this guidance and reflect engagement with school stakeholders and community members, including but not limited to administrators, faculty, staff, students, parents/legal guardians of students, local health departments, local health care providers, and, where appropriate, affiliated organizations (e.g., union, alumni, and/or community-based groups). Specifically, each school district, BOCES, charter school, and
private school must develop and submit to the New York State Department of Health (DOH) and the New York State Education Department (NYSED), or the State University of New York (SUNY) for charter schools authorized by SUNY, a plan that, at minimum, covers:
(1) Reopening of school facilities for in-person instruction,
(2) Monitoring of health conditions,
(3) Containment of potential transmission of the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), and
(4) Closure of school facilities and in-person instruction, if necessitated by widespread virus
transmission.

Sports and Outdoors

Governor’s Strike Force to Open Texas – Gyms / Exercise Facilities Minimum Standard Health Protocols

Gyms and exercise facilities and classes may operate up to 50% of the total listed occupancy of the gym or exercise facility. Employees and contractors of the gym or exercise facility are not counted towards the occupancy limitation. All employees and customers must wear a face covering (over the nose and mouth) wherever it is not feasible to maintain six feet of social distancing from another individual not in the same household. The following are the minimum recommended health protocols for all gyms and exercise facilities and classes, whether indoor, outdoor, individual, or group, choosing to operate in Texas. Gyms and exercise facilities and classes may adopt additional protocols consistent with their specific needs and circumstances to help protect the health and safety of all employees, contractors, and customers.
The virus that causes COVID-19 can be spread to others by infected persons who have few or no symptoms. Even if an infected person is only mildly ill, the people they spread it to may become seriously ill or even die, especially if that person is 65 or older with pre-existing health conditions that place them at higher risk. Because of the hidden nature of this threat, everyone should rigorously follow the practices specified in these protocols, all of which facilitate a safe and measured reopening of Texas. The virus that causes COVID-19 is still circulating in our
communities. We should continue to observe practices that protect everyone, including those who are most vulnerable.

Sports and Outdoors

Reopening: Guidance for Gyms and Workout Facilities – American Industrial Hygiene Association® (AIHA®)

Gyms and workout facilities have been very challenged during the COVID-19 pandemic. Many of
these businesses have been viewed as “non-essential” by state governments and are closed. Many have been forced to lay off or furlough key staff members, which may complicate reopening as states start to relax shelter-in-place and stay-at-home restrictions.
With such restrictions beginning to lift, gym owners are faced with difficult questions that should be addressed before reopening, such as:
• How can we protect our employees and gym members from COVID-19 while working out at our
facility?
• How do we assure gym members that we are doing all we can to protect them from COVID-19?
• How can we minimize the risk of disease transmission if those who are ill or those who have had contact with positive COVID-19 are members of our gyms?
• What do we do if a member is sick or not following guidelines?
According to Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and other credible health resources, COVID-19 is not spread through perspiration (sweat) however, items touched by many people in a gym (e.g., barbells, weight machines, aerobic fitness equipment, etc.) could pose a risk for transmission of settled respiratory droplets.
Measures can be taken to reduce the risk of transmitting COVID-19 from person-to-person spread through respiratory droplets. The use of proper disinfectant and cleaning techniques, practicing social distancing, personal protective equipment, minimizing clients in the gym at one time, etc. can all be put in place to help minimize the potential for exposure and the spread of the virus.
This document offers practical guidance for gym owners to implement interim measures to reduce the risk of transmitting COVID-19. It addresses the key questions above and provides tips for employees and gym members.